Andrew & Andrew Family Solicitors – Divorce and Fathers

When divorce occurs, it is never a pleasant experience, especially when children are involved. Andrew & Andrew family solicitors will take care of all the legal paperwork and ensure the best outcome for the children.

[PORTSMOUTH, 31/7/2018] – In most cases, underage children tend to stay with their mothers either through a residence order or without one. However, fathers have the right to see their children and get involved in their lives or major decisions affecting their lives.

Ideally, ex-partners should come to an agreement about their children with the help of Andrew & Andrew family solicitors. This agreement will then be legally bound by Andrew & Andrew family solicitors. If joint custody is granted by the court, fathers have the same rights as mothers and their children can stay with them for the same amount of time throughout the year.

However, even if joint custody is not granted, Andrew & Andrew family solicitors will ensure that the best agreement will be reached, so that fathers can have regular contact with their children.

More importantly, a legally binding agreement set out by Andrew & Andrew family solicitors will ensure that financial provisions are made for children and their welfare.

Just like mothers, Andrew & Andrew family solicitors will inform fathers that they are bound by parental responsibility by law and have equal rights and responsibilities to their children.

What if the mother makes it difficult for the father to visit their child?

In most cases, visitation rights are agreed outside court and Andrew & Andrew family solicitors can help negotiate. However, in some cases, a mother can make it difficult for her ex-partner to see their child. In this case, Andrew & Andrew family solicitors can help draft a contact order.

In most cases, contact orders drafted by Andrew & Andrew family solicitors are carefully revised by the court before the hearing and take into consideration various factors such as the reasons behind the mother’s behaviour, the wishes, education and emotional needs of the child as well as the potential of harm to the child.

These can possibly weigh against the father, but the sole intention of the court is to protect the child and ensure its well-being.